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Below are some photos and videos taken along a transect of the floodplain on Peter and Kate Marshall’s property. I hope you enjoy these images (taken 36 hrs after a 180mm overnight event), with the creek running crystal clear and spread out across the floodplain on Sunningdale.

To put what you’re seeing in context, most other watercourses in the region are restricted predominantly to the channel due to the erosion and incision caused by past land management practices. Although man-made, the hydrology in this landscape is much closer to the way it operated pre Euro settlement, in an intact chain of ponds or swampy meadow system. The noise of the frogs in the videos is testament to the significant aquatic and wetland habitat which has also been created.

Photo locations taken across a transect of the floodplain at Sunningdale

Locations of photos taken across a transect of the floodplain at Sunningdale. (For some scale, the image is 350m wide, and the main channel located at the meandering tree-line, flowing from bottom to top).

To flick through a larger slideshow of the images, click on any of the thumbnails below

Short video locations taken across a transect of the floodplain at Sunningdale

Locations of short videos taken across a transect of the floodplain at Sunningdale

Finally, another interesting little clip is of the ground literally bubbling as the subsurface flow rehydrates the gravel and sediments below the surface. This stored moisture benefits the land’s production and drought proofing resilience, while also providing a more sustained base-flow to the landscape below.

See the articles tagged as Key floodplain processes for more information on what is being achieved from a landscape perspective.

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Disclaimer: Where water flow is concerned there are substantial risks involved. While the information and images we publish are formulated in good faith, with the intention of raising awareness of landscape rehydration processes, the contents do not take into account all the social, environmental and regulatory factors which need to be considered before putting that information into practice.  Accordingly, no person should rely on anything contained within as a substitute for specific professional advice.

Article and Images © Cam Wilson, Earth Integral, 2013

A stroll, post flood

A stroll, post flood

A newly planted 5 ha mixed-Oak and hazel, truffle inoculated dehesa.

Building on the success of their well-respected business Terra Preta Truffles, the Marshalls have planted a further 5 ha of truffle orchard this season (click here for a virtual tour of Sunningdale). The system includes a wide variety of oaks, sourced from the Canberra region, interplanted with hazels which provide a shorter term truffle return. Under the guidance of top mycologists, the trees have been propagated and inoculated on farm this time around, partly because of the availability of truffles for inoculant, but also due to the very mediocre (and no-doubt concerning for many) results in the findings of a recent ANU study on the Australian truffle nursery industry.

Click on one of the images below for a slideshow of how we went about planting each of the valuable trees in ‘Mari’s Montado’ (named after Mari Korhonen who spent six months with the Marshalls last year and planted a good portion of this paddock).

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Copyright Cam Wilson, Earth Integral, 2012